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Aplocheilus panchax
by Charles Drew (H&DAS)


The Aplocheilus panchax, at one time called Panchax panchax, or commonly the Blue Panchax, is found over a very wide range which includes India, Burma, the Malay Peninsula, Thailand and Indonesia. Although called the Blue Panchax, most of the strains I have seen over the years have been basically green. My males are green with a whitish band or edging on the caudal fin. Some also have a black outline and, yes, under the right lighting conditions they may show a bluish sheen. The females are basically pale green and have clear fins and a black dot at the base of the dorsal fin. They are peaceful, grow as large as two and a half or three inches and will not eat anything, including tankmates, that they cannot swallow whole.

Spawn these fish by placing a pair or small group in a five or ten gallon tank containing a floating spawning mop. Water conditions are not extremely important as long as the water isn't terribly hard. The temperature should be maintained at about 26 C or 78 F for best results. The species is quite prolific and the medium sized eggs are picked from the mops and placed in a plastic container with a drop or two of acriflavine or methylene blue to help protect them until they hatch about two weeks later, depending on temperature.

The fry are large enough to eat live baby brine shrimp and microworms as soon as they hatch. They are best started in a tank of shallow water which helps keep them and their food close together for the first couple of weeks. They grow quickly and in a few months the fry should be large enough to breed.

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