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Getting Started


If you have just bought a tank, or are planning to buy one, here you can find what to do next.

Buying a tank

The first thing you'll have to decide about is the size of the tank you'd like to have. If it is going to be your first tank I'd advise you not to buy a 200*50*50 tank, but rather to start with a smaller one. After practising for a year you will have accumulated enough knowledge to start with a big(ger) tank. A 60 or better an 80*40*40 cm tank is a nice tank to start with. They don't require the amount of work large tanks do, and can be purchased quite cheap. Smaller tanks have other problems, since they don't have much buffering capacity a small mistake can be fatal.

The first chapter in older aquariumbooks usually is about the building of a tank. Nowadays, purchase is a much faster and sometimes even a cheaper method. For people that do want to build their own check out the page on how to do that.

Accessories

There's an absolute need for accessories. A plain glas tank, filled with water is not sufficient for most fish. For a coldwatertank nature can provide you with all the accessories you need. Please check out the following page if your interest goes out to your local pondlife. Coldwatertanks. You may want to write down the list, or just go to the checklist page and print it.

Accesory 1, Light.

All planted tanks need light. Sunlight can be used for this, but it's hard to regulate. Other options are to use lightbulbs, fluorescent light and HQI lighting. The last one is usually only used for large showtanks. The plain lightbulbs are usefull, and plants can grow using this type of light. However, don't be surprised if some plants will die due to lack of light. Another point against using plain bulbs is the amount of energy they use, and the heat that's generated by them. Currently, fluorescent lighting is considered the best method. Low energy cost, combined with a high

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