Home

Descriptions

Fish (by common or latin name)

Barbs

Cyprinoidae
Catfish Siluroidei
Cichlids Cichlidae
Killifish Cyprinodontidae
Labyrinth fish Anabantoidei
Livebearer Poeciliidae
American Characins Characoidae
African Characins Characoidae

Other Fish

Diseases

Invertebrates

Aquarium Plants

Biotopes

Food

Marine fish

Algae
Products

 
Web aquaworld

General

General

Books

Fish pictures

Articles

Great Names
My tanks

Site history

Forums

Labyrinth fish

Dwarf cichlids

Links

Links

Labyrinth fish

Linksites

Other

This site

Map

FAQ

Site policies
Acknowledgements
References
Awards
E-mail

 




Corydoras hastatus, Eigenmann & Eigenmann, 1888

Origin:South-America, Brazil, Amazonas, Villa Bella, Mato Grosso, upper Rio Paraguay. Also in Rio Pilcomayo in Paraguay.

Etymology: Hatatus in latin means "spear-like", probably referring to the stripe on the sides of the animal, ending in the "spearblade".

Synonyms:C. australe Eigenmann & Ward, 1907.

First import:1866 by L. Agassiz.

Description:Bodycolor silver, dark stripe on each side of the body,ending in a larger diamond shaped blotch, fins transparent.

Care:Corydoras hastatus can be kept in a 40 cm tank with good filtration, but no strong currents should be present in the tank. A dark soil and tempered light are highly appreciated, as well as lots of plants and pieces of driftwood, on which they like to rest. Since Corydoras hastatus mostly swims in mid-water the soil type isn't too important. In nature they swim in schools, often in combination with characins, and this should also be the case in an aquarium. Minimal 5-6 of these fish, but nicer is a school of 10 or more fish in a large tank like in the picture on the right(300k version available in the image section!). Predators will attack them if they think they can eat them. The attacked fish' usually die. I kept them together with juvenile Betta bellica, but one day the bellica started to attack the corydoras, and all of them died within a day(without being eaten).

Temperature:20-24

Feeding:Small live food and flake food.

Size:3.0 cm

pH: 5.0-7.5 Hardness: 2-15

Breeding:A 60 cm tank for a school of 8 of these fish (pH doesn't seem to be an issue, they breed in neutral and slightly acidic water), little light, temperature 24 degrees. Lots of live food, artemia and especially daphnia. A low waterlevel can help to get the fish to breed. The fish breed in the lower and middle regions of the water in typical T-formation. One 1 mm egg is laid at a time, up to 15 in total. Eggs hatch after 4 days, and two days later the fry can be fed with small live food like microworms.

Sexual dimorphism:Females can only be distinguished from the males by the eggs that can be seen in sexually mature specimens.

Prices:Netherlands: 1-1.5€

Additional:This is a really interesting fish to keep in a smaller tank together with other small fish, especially characins.

Picture references:Pictures: E. Naus

References:Hierronimus, H. (1997): Ihr Hobby: Corydoras Pantzerwelse. Bede Verlag, Ruhmannsfelden, Germany.Lambourne, D. ((1995): Corydoras catfish, An Aquarist's Handbook. Blandford, London, UK.

All images, information, text, and other information/items in this site © Aquaworld website as described in the Berne convention.